US Senator Kennedy says he'll vote for any healthcare plan that's better than Obamacare
Posted on 3/17/2017 12:12:00 PM.

US Senator John Kennedy says there are problems with the House Republican’s plan to overhaul the nation’s health care law, but he’s confident it will be improved as it moves through the legislative process. Kennedy likes that the House bill is not as generous with tax credits as Obamacare, but it’s not ungenerous either.

“A family of four, under the House bill, can qualify for a tax credit, basically a check from the federal government, up to $14,000 to buy insurance,” Kennedy said.

Giving states more flexibility with how they operate Medicaid is one of the changes Kennedy would like to see with the GOP health care plan. He also wants to see more healthcare assistance for those that need it.

“I think without spending more money we can recalibrate those tax credits and help people more who really need the help,” Kennedy said.

Opponents of the proposal say more people will become uninsured. But Kennedy says that’s because their plan repeals the individual and employer mandates. He says at least some people will decide not to purchase insurance and give up their coverage.

“That’s the biggest reason that you’re going to have people become uninsured, but they’re becoming uninsured by choice, and I think that’s the American way,” Kennedy said.

 
 
 
 
 
John Kennedy, Affordable Care Act, healthcare, Congress

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