State legislator looks to tighten controls on city marshals
Posted on 11/10/2015 3:09:00 AM.
The city of Marksville is trying to come to grips as why city marshals opened fire on a vehicle last week, killing a 6-year-old boy.  Derrick Stafford and Norris Greenhouse, Jr. are accused of shooting and killing Jeremy Mardis following a police chase.  


Marksville state Representative Robert Johnson says he's looking to determine under what authority the city marshal acts.
 
"And whether or not city marshals should be conducting patrols and if they do conduct patrols, mandating that they have written policies and procedures regarding the use of deadly force."

He says legislators must do whatever they can to prevent a tragedy such as this from happening again.  Because Mardis and his father, Chris Few, are white and the suspects are black, there is concern that some will try to make this incident a racial issue.  Johnson doesn't believe that to be the case.

"I don't think this was a racially motivated type crime.  I think this was just a crime where procedure was not followed."

He described actions and conduct of the suspects in the shooting as unconscionable.  Johnson says he'll introduce legislation to tighten controls on the use of weapons by local marshals.

"If city marshals are going to have firearms, then they should adopt procedures on the use of deadly force and those procedures should be based on the model rules that police conduct." 
Norris Greenhouse, Derrick Stafford, Jeremy Mardis, Robert Johnson, fatal shooting, Marksville

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