Special session ends with lawmakers tapping $99M from rainy day fund
Posted on 2/22/2017 6:47:00 PM.

After 10 days of what became some heated debates, the special session ended with lawmakers agreeing to use $99 million from the rainy day fund to address a $304 million midyear deficit. Governor John Bel Edwards originally asked legislators to use $119 million from the state's savings account to minimize cuts to state agencies. 
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John Bel Edwards, special session, rainy day fund, budget deficit

Uncertainty surrounds final day of special session
Posted on 2/22/2017 4:39:00 AM.

It’s the final day of the special session, and the major sticking point is how much of the rainy day fund to tap to resolve a $304 million midyear deficit. Governor Edwards and the Senate proposes using $99 million from the state’s savings account, but LaPolitics.com publisher Jeremy Alford says House Republicans want the Senate to pass a bill that frees up statutory dedications in future budgets.
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Jeremy Alford, special session, budget deficit, rainy day fund

Lawmakers close to reaching compromise to resolve budget shortfall
Posted on 2/21/2017 10:46:00 AM.

In the final two days of the special session, lawmakers are close to reaching a compromise on how many rainy day dollars to use versus what cuts to make to resolve a $304 million midyear deficit. The Senate approved a plan that would tap $99 million from the state’s savings account. Senate President John Alario says it’s a fair compromise that would protect vital services from deep cuts.
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John Alario, Taylor Barras, special session, rainy day fund, budget deficit

Republicans and Democrats differ on how much money to use from Rainy Day Fund
Posted on 2/20/2017 1:54:00 PM.

The Louisiana Senate passed a measure on Sunday night that would use $99 million of the Rainy Day Fund to help offset the state’s $304 million budget deficit. Last week, the House passed legislation that would use $75 million, but Chairman of the House Democratic Caucus, Gene Reynolds, supports using the higher amount.
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Special Session, Rainy Day Fund, Gene Reynolds, Rick Edmonds

House debates how much of rainy day fund to use to close budget gap
Posted on 2/17/2017 5:47:00 AM.

Today the state House will decide how much, if any, of the rainy day fund to use to close a $304 million budget shortfall. New Orleans Representative Walt Leger says lawmakers passed a budget last year describing what they want to accomplish for the people of Louisiana, and it’s the legislature’s responsibility to meet those promises. He says the best way to accomplish that would be to use $119 million from the rainy day fund.
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Walt Leger, Rick Edmonds, budget, special session, rainy day fund

Debate continues over whether or not to tap rainy day fund
Posted on 2/15/2017 11:59:00 AM.

The debate continues at the state capitol on whether or not to tap into the rainy day fund to address a $304 million midyear budget deficit. House Appropriations Chairman Cameron Henry opposes the use of rainy day fund and continues to push for reductions in state spending.
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Cameron Henry, special session, budget,

Analyst: Special session revolves around use of rainy day fund
Posted on 2/13/2017 10:42:00 AM.

Tonight Louisiana lawmakers will convene for their third special session in just one year, as they attempt to resolve a $304 million midyear budget deficit. ULM political science professor Dr. Joshua Stockley says one of the biggest battles will be whether or not to tap into the rainy day fund, and how much. He says if they do not use the fund, lawmakers will face some tough decisions.
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Joshua Stockley, special session, budget, rainy day fund

Special session begins Monday night to address budget deficit
Posted on 2/13/2017 4:10:00 AM.
A 10-day special session begins tonight as Governor John Bel Edwards is asking lawmakers to use a combination of cuts and money from the rainy day fund to close a 304-million dollar midyear budget deficit. Commissioner of Administration Jay Dardenne says it’s their recommendation that legislators approve the use of 119-million dollars in rainy day dollars.
special session, Jay Dardenne, Jay Morris, Cameron Henry, budget cuts

UNO poll finds most believe former Gov Bobby Jindal is to blame for state's fiscal woes
Posted on 2/9/2017 5:20:00 PM.
A UNO statewide poll finds 6-out-of-10 Louisiana residents blame former Governor Bobby Jindal for the state's budget problems. The state legislature is set to begin a third special session to correct a budget deficit since Jindal left office. UNO political scienstist Ed Chervenak says the state's fiscal troubles started early in Jindal's term. 
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Bobby Jindal, John Bel Edwards, budget problems, UNO poll, Ed Chervenak, special session

Gov Edwards releases plan to close $304 million budget deficit
Posted on 2/6/2017 4:16:00 PM.

Governor John Bel Edwards has unveiled his plan for resolving a $304 million midyear budget deficit. The governor’s Communications Director Richard Carbo says the proposal calls for using money from the rainy day fund, a large cut to the Department of Health’s budget, and state elected officials would also make cuts to their budgets.
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John Bel Edwards, Richard Carbo, special session, budget cuts

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